Wed.Mar 29, 2023

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Black Men’s Mental Health Addressed During Black Men’s Research Institute Symposium

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

The Black Men’s Research Institute (BMRI) at Morehouse College hosted its first Spring Symposium addressing health issues for African American men. Taken place at the Atlanta University Center’s Woodruff’s Library, the “Changing the Paradigm” symposium began its two-day conference with a discussion on mental health. Dr. Walter M. Kimbrough , Interim Executive Director for BMRI, wants the symposium to dive deeply into mental health and how it affects Black men and their communities.

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DEI: Informing the Implicit to Create the Explicit in Classroom Culture

The Scholarly Teacher

Karen Blaha , University of St. Francis Joyce Kraus , University of St. Francis Key Statement: DEI: Creating a Classroom Culture Keywords: Diversity, Instructional Practices, Classroom Culture Introduction Inclusive classrooms and equitable instructional practices have been a subject of discussion for several years, particularly within higher learning institutions.

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Report Shows the Shift Away from Tenured Faculty in the U.S. Academic Workforce

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Over the past three decades, U.S. academic employment has dramatically shifted from mostly full-time tenured or tenure-track faculty to mostly contingent positions. That's according to a new report from the American Association of University Professors (AAUP)which provides data depicting the shift away from tenure to contingent faculty at most U.S. colleges and universities.

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Spring enrollment steady, just not for all institutions

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Image: Rising numbers of community college students kept total enrollment across all sectors of higher education flat this spring despite a decline in the largest category of institutions by share of enrollment: public four-year universities. Data released today by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center come after enrollment declines at colleges and universities across the country during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Housing and Urban Development Department Gives $5.5 Million to Texas Southern and NC A&T for Centers of Excellence

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has announced awards totaling $5.5 million to create or strengthen Centers of Excellence (COE) conducting housing and community development research. Marcia Fudge The money – for historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) – was split between two schools. Texas Southern University (TSU) received $3 million and North Carolina A&T University (N.C.

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Iowa Wesleyan University announces closure

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Image: Iowa Wesleyan University is closing, citing rising costs, shifting enrollment trends, declining fundraising and the governor’s rejection of a proposal for federal COVID-19 relief funds. The 181-year-old private university made the announcement Tuesday , following a unanimous vote by the Board of Trustees to cease operations at the end of the current academic year.

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New York Knicks Partner with Verizon to Honor HBCUs

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

The New York Knicks partnered with Verizon to honor historically Black college and universities (HBCUs) Mar. 27, with one 18-year-old high school senior from Harlem receiving a scholarship, Patch reported. Bri Butler getting surprised during the Mar. 27 Knicks game Bri Butler was awarded on the court Monday night, during the Knicks’s game against the Houston Rockets in Madison Square Garden.

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Temple University President Resigns, Ending Short Tenure

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Dr. Jason Wingard, the first Black president of Temple University in Philadelphia, has resigned Mar. 28. Temple’s board of trustees has accepted Wingard’s resignation, according to a statement Tuesday. Jason Wingard Amid Wingard’s short and rocky tenure was worsening crime around campus, a graduate student strike, and a loss of confidence in his leadership among some faculty.

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Temple University president resigns

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Image: Temple University president Jason Wingard resigned abruptly on Tuesday after less than two years on the job, the Board of Trustees announced. The move comes amid a period of turmoil at the university, marked by a contentious seven-week strike by graduate student workers, the shooting death of a Temple police officer last month and ongoing fears of violence in the North Philadelphia neighborhood where Temple is located.

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HEATHER QUIRE

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Heather Quire Heather Quire has been named associate vice chancellor and dean of campus life at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She holds a bachelor’s degree in information systems from Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and a master’s in organizational leadership from Mansfield University in Pennsylvania.

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The importance of play in academics' professional development (opinion)

Confessions of a Community College Dean

It can be valuable for not only children but also grown-ups, write Niya Bond and Todd Zakrajsek, and in fact should be a priority for academics’ professional development. Job Tags: FACULTY JOBS Ad keywords: faculty teachinglearning Section: Teaching and Learning Editorial Tags: Career Advice Teaching Today Show on Jobs site: Image Source: Mary Ne/istock/getty images plus Image Size: Thumbnail-horizontal Multiple Authors: Niya Bond Todd Zakrajsek Is this diversity newsletter?

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GARRETT GREEN

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Garrett Green Garrett Green has been named chief diversity officer at Augusta University in Georgia. Green served as director of multicultural student engagement at the university. He holds a bachelor’s degree in communications and media studies, a master’s in higher education administration from Georgia Southern University, and an educational doctorate from Augusta.

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What Higher Education Can Learn from a Public Charity Hospital

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Blog: Higher Ed Gamma As psychological anthropologist Nat Kendall-Taylor recently noted , When the College Board revised the draft African American studies curriculum, it removed the word “systemic.” The result: To discourage students from learning and thinking “critically about the connection between the design of our institutions and the uneven way in which opportunity and resources are meted out in America.

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‘We are heartbroken’: Financial woes force Iowa Wesleyan to close its doors

University Business

Small private school Iowa Wesleyan University, founded before the Civil War, announced its plans to close at the conclusion of the academic year on Tuesday. The board of trustees unanimously voted to shut the school down despite growing enrollment post-pandemic, thanks in part to a partnership with a local community college. Its comeback, however, could not exceed its swollen financial burdens due partly to inflation, according to Iowa Wesleyan University’s website.

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Therapy mini horses boost student morale

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Image: Move over, therapy dogs—there’s a new stress relief animal on the block: mini horses. Colleges invite mini horses trained to provide emotional support onto campus during stressful times in the term, like finals week or midterms, to provide a fun stress relief experience for its campus community. What’s the need: During finals week each semester, the University of Central Florida receives higher levels of mental health calls to its police department, a consequence of incr

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5 Ways to Yield Black Students

Campus Sonar

When developing a strategy to enroll Black students your first step is to yield. Historically, the Black student experience is riddled with disparities and broken trust, but you can activate change by reflecting and acknowledging your institution’s history with Black students and having the hard conversations. Next, prepare yourself to participate in a public conversation about advancing future Black lives in this country.

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No Winners in a Curriculum War

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Blog: Just Visiting When I wrote the proposal for the book that would become The Writer’s Practice: Building Confidence in Your Nonfiction Writing , I described it as an alternative to the text They Say/I Say by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein for a couple of reasons. One was that They Say/I Say had sold several million copies and is one of the most widely used textbooks – regardless of subject – and publishers like to know that there is a potential market for a book before

Mining 98
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Fresh Starts, Mud Season, and Our Why

Proctor Academy

Sunshine and blue skies, with temperatures flirting with 50 degrees, is a good reminder that the stubborn New Hampshire winter is gradually releasing its grip on campus. March is an ugly month around these parts, but as we launch the Spring Term, we jump into classes and spring athletic and afternoon programs with excitement and anticipation. It is a chance to start fresh, and an opportunity to reflect on our “why” as a school.

IT 78
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Colleges start new programs

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Hiram College is starting graduate-level certificate in trauma-informed education. Mississippi State University at Meridian will be starting its first doctoral degree: a doctorate in psychology. Tallahassee Community College is starting a bachelor of applied science in business administration. University of Arkansas is starting an M.S. in marketing.

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English students spend a fortune to go to university. Shouldn’t that buy them more teaching and less partying? | Adrian Chiles

The Guardian Higher Education

The workload was light enough when I was an undergraduate, long before tuition fees. Almost 40 years on, kids are paying through the nose – and for what? There’s a young woman I know in west London who, having bagged excellent A-levels, chose to study in France. While all her friends, similarly qualified, went off to various redbrick British universities, she picked a fashion school in Paris.

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Wayne State Suspends English Professor for Social Media Post

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Wayne State University has suspended an English professor for a social media post that allegedly called for violence, The Detroit Free Press reported. The university announced the suspension but did not identify the professor. President Roy Wilson said, “The post stated that rather than ‘shouting down’ those with whom we disagree, one would be justified to commit murder to silence them … We have on many occasions defended the right of free speech guaranteed by the First

Media 75
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Three Ways Cissexism Shows Up At Work: How to Understand, Unpack, and Create More Equitable Workplaces

Paradigm IQ

On March 31st, people across the globe will take time to recognize the International Transgender Day of Visibility. In addition to celebrating the trans community on this day, it’s important to understand that the trans community still faces numerous examples of cissexism — the discrimination both implicitly and explicitly of trans people — that reduce the.

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How IT Departments Can Shape Acceptable Use Policies in Higher Ed

EdTech Magazine - Higher Education

Everyone has encountered plenty of fine print, whether they’re registering a new product or creating a new account. For higher education institutions, the fine print has another name: an acceptable use policy. While often overlooked, AUPs ensure the protection of data, critical and sensitive information, institutional assets, and the online security of faculty, staff and students.

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Listed Tech – Our Take on the Quottly Acquisition by Parchment

Parchment

Add post content. There’s always more to learn. Press Releases Parchment News Parchment Announces Partnership with SmartPanda and Launches Powerful New Tool for Transcript Data Extraction and Automation Blog Admissions Are Micro-Credentials Right for Your Institution? Blog Admissions A Fresh Admission Strategy to Hit Goals Ready to feel the power of Parchment?

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Considering Apple: How to Download the Studocu App for iOS

Hanover Research

As reported by a 2020 survey from Hobsons and Hanover Research, more than 50% of college students claimed that they were struggling to complete their coursework. The post Considering Apple: How to Download the Studocu App for iOS appeared first on Hanover Research.

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S.C. State students voice safety concerns as SLED investigates two on-campus shootings in March

University Business

Students at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg are raising concerns about their safety following two on-campus shootings this month. Both happened at the Hugine Suites apartment complex. The most recent shooting happened on Saturday night at around 11:30 P.M. There were no injuries. On March 3, another shooting at the apartments left a student injured.

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Lesley Faculty Vote No Confidence in President—Again - Ryan Quinn, Inside Higher Ed

Ray Schroeder

Lesley University’s Faculty Assembly says it has voted no confidence in university president Janet Steinmayer for the second time in roughly a year. This time, it says, it also voted no confidence in the university’s Board of Trustees. Grace Ferris, the assembly chair, said the university shared in January that it faces a $10 million deficit, and it seemed like the president and board were saying then that they needed to come up with a plan to fix this by March 1.

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Bill would ban Connecticut colleges and universities from trying to get students to bet on sports

University Business

If you’re looking to place a bet on the Huskies, you may have a long drive ahead of you. Like New York, Connecticut has followed New Jersey’s lead and has banned betting on in-state college teams. It is illegal to do so both online and in person. Rep. Amy Morrin Bello (D-District 28) has proposed a bill that she said would prevent Connecticut colleges and universities from directly soliciting students to bet on sports.

IT 52
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Louisiana’s U of Holy Cross to Reduce Size of Faculty - Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed

Ray Schroeder

The University of Holy Cross, in Louisiana, will reduce the size of its faculty from 74 to 60 by 2026, 4WWL News reported. The university said most of those impacted by the change will be instructors of general studies. “As a result of these reductions, the University of Holy Cross is repositioning itself to more effectively address the growing demands of the workforce by aligning our academic programs to meet the needs of our community and beyond,” said Christopher Rholdon, vice president for s

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How IT departments can shape acceptable use policies in higher ed

University Business

Everyone has encountered plenty of fine print, whether they’re registering a new product or creating a new account. For higher education institutions, the fine print has another name: an acceptable use policy. While often overlooked, AUPs ensure the protection of data, critical and sensitive information, institutional assets, and the online security of faculty, staff and students.

IT 52
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Stories that Shaped Us: A Lifelong Learning Journey

ISA Journal

Makenzie Kuykendall is an ISA London alumna and current ISA/TEAN Global Ambassador at the University of Idaho…

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Arizona Admits Failings in Murder of Professor, Faces Suit

Confessions of a Community College Dean

University of Arizona president Robert C. Robbins admitted failings in the October murder of a professor, Thomas Meixner, on the campus. “There were systemic issues across our university that should’ve been identified and corrected. I’m angry at myself that I did not do more to prevent this tragedy and most of all I’m angry at this man that took from us our loved one, friend and colleague,” Robbins said at a press briefing, 13 News reported.

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Yahoo Finance: Time and Engagement Rank Among the Most Persistent Training Challenges for Plumbing and Electrical Companies

Hanover Research

Results of a new survey by Interplay Learning and Hanover Research indicate decision-makers in those industries are looking for effective, scalable solutions to help their companies grow. The post Yahoo Finance: Time and Engagement Rank Among the Most Persistent Training Challenges for Plumbing and Electrical Companies appeared first on Hanover Research.

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How Childhood Preferences Shape Adult Tastes: Academic Minute

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Today on the Academic Minute : Arianna Maffei, professor of neurobiology and behavior at Stony Brook University, looks at how childhood preferences influence the food we like as adults. Learn more about the Academic Minute here. Is this diversity newsletter?: Hide by line?: Disable left side advertisement?: Is this Career Advice newsletter?

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Influential Women in Higher Education

Dr. Josie Ahlquist

It still kinda blows my mind that America may have been founded in 1776, but it wasn’t until (almost) 200 years later that women started to receive “equal” treatment. It was… And, unfortunately, the race is not over. We didn’t always have a month dedicated to celebrating women. The National Women’s History Project was founded in 1980 and lobbied congress to designate a month to celebrate women.

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Children’s Food Experiences Shape Grown-Ups’ Taste Preferences

Confessions of a Community College Dean

Why do we like the food we like as adults? In today’s Academic Minute, Stony Brook University’s Arianna Maffei looks at the early years to find out. Maffei is a professor of neurobiology and behavior at Stony Brook, part of the State University of New York. A transcript of this podcast can be found here. Section: Academic Minute File: 03-29-23 Stony Brook - Children’s food experience shapes grown-ups’ taste preference.

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Cole, Lewis Receive National Humanities Medal at the White House

Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Two prominent Black academicians--Drs. Johnnetta Betsch Cole and Earl Lewis--were among 12 individuals who was awarded the National Humanities Medal at the White House earlier this month. “The National Humanities Medal recipients have enriched our world through writing that moves and inspires us; scholarship that enlarges our understanding of the past; and through their dedication to educating, informing, and giving voice to communities and histories often overlooked,” said NEH Chair Shelly

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